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. >> and in washington, msnbc and "time" senior political analyst, mark halperin. thanks so much, everybody, for being with us. >> morning. >> a very provocative, according to "the wall street journal," proposal that tim geithner brought over to the republican leaders yesterday. >> how'd that go? >> "the new york times" said it was, quote, loaded with democratic priorities and short on spending cuts. i'm just curious, it didn't go well. obviously, mitch mcconnell laughed at the offer, which i would have laughed at the offer, too. >> you would have laughed out loud at the treasury secretary? making a presentation? >> you know what i actually would have said? >> what? >> listen, we're all busy people. this is a critical time. if you're going to come over here and insult us and intentionally try to provoke us, you can do that. but i'm going back to work now. and i'd walk out. listen, this thing, $1.6 trillion of revenue, of new taxes, no specific cuts according to "the new york times" and "wall street journal." actually, $50 billion more in stimulus spending and no specific spending cuts. it was a nonsta
nugent, a columnist for "the washington times," pimps, wohors have a brat for welfare america. that was also a defeat for hate last night. >> it was a defeat with hate listen to the coalition this president has assembled through this election process. have you 93% of the of the latino vote. 70% of the asian-american vote. a majority of young, single women. i mean, it is an extraordinary coalition. look at the movement we made along the lines of progressive politics. you know, we have movement with the legalization of marijuana in a couple of states. that's less about people getting high and more about us addressing the injustices in our arrest too many substance abusers. look how many women are in the equality is put on ballots and vote the through. the question really is, can we continue to be behind this, can we continue to push this president and work with him in order to have the kind of effe? forget liberal versus conservative, just any government. >> john boehner, leader of the republican party, he spoke moments ago about the fiscal cliff. take a listen to h >> shoring
"hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. president obama has got a spring in his step this friday before the election propelled by a good week on the job and 171,000 new jobs in this morning's report. he's out there in ohio fighting the good fight. i only make predictions when people make me make them, but the trajectory, the momentum, now seems pro-obama. pennsylvania will hold, ohio looks good but close, and all the battlegrounds look winnable for the president. the huge question is turnout, that and rational self-interest. the young who believe in science, women who believe in protecting their rights, latinos who can see a brighter future with a supportive president all need to get out, show up, and vote. there's no reward for a failure. in a free society, a democratic society is a failure, deeply personal, you blew it if you don't vote. let's see where it stands. i'm joined by mother jones washington bureau chief david corn and joy reid. do you think i'm a little strong there? >> no. >> i don't want to talk to anybody after this electio
politicians in washington to control health care choices that women should be making for themselves. so, wisconsin, we know what change is. we know what the future requires. we don't need a big government agenda or a small government agenda. we need a middle class agenda that rewards hard work and responsibility. we don't need a partisan agenda. we need a common sense agenda that says, when we educate a poor child, we'll a. be better off we need a vision that says we don't just look out for yourself. we look out for one another. we look out for future generations. and we meet those obligations by working together. that's the change we believe in. that's what this election's all. now, let's be clear. achieving this agenda won't be easy. it's never been easy. we always knew that. back in 2008, when we talked about change i told you, i wasn't just talking about changing presidents. i wasn't just talking about changing parties. i was talking about changing our politics. i ran because the voices of the american people, your voice, had been shut out of our democracy for way too long. by lobby
'm in a bit of a food coma. i need to admit that. i may be slow. >> well done. and from washington, from "the washington post" newsroom, pulitzer prize-winning editorial writer for "the washington post," jonathan capehart. >> hello. i spent a long time on the road driving back from south hampton, but i made it in time. >> thank goodness. since andrew ross sorkin is adopting the bush policy of preemption, let's begin with him. >> okay. very good. >> what's at stake, obviously, a lot of posturing over the past couple of weeks since the election about the fiscal cliff. what is at stake here for both sides? what happens if they don't get a deal? >> well, look. i think what happens to both sides, it's not even what happens to both sides, what happens to us which is the collective, right? it's what happens to the country which is 4% of gdp disappears overnight. and that's what this is all about. by the way, it's not just about what happens january 1st or 11:59 the day before january 1st. it's already starting to impact the economy. whether it impacts consumers -- and we'll find out today, by the wa
on the budget? live from the russell rotunda in washington, d.c., the independent bernie sanders of vermont. is this newly reelected president the same commander in chief that you saw in the past four years? we're hearing people like that comment. more testosterone. >> thomas, time will tell. but it is clear to me that the president must keep the promise that he made too to the american people. and that is not to do deficit deductions on the backs of the elderly and disabled veterans programs, and we are going to ask the wealthiest people in the country to start paying their fair share of taxes. that's what he told the american people. he won on that. many of us said the same thing. democrats won 25 out of 3 # senate races, and he has got to stick to that position. we will be right behind him on that. >> sir, you've been vocal and an advocate for the progressive agenda. what do you think the president can get done as a liberal? we talked about reducing the deficit, avoiding the fiscal cliff. where will the middle be met? >> on this issue, i think the american people spoke during the electio
. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. let me start with this. the hurricane and this president. hemingway called it grace under pressure, the highly educated call it good government. the american people who count the most call president obama's handling of tropical storm sandy positive. 4 out of 5 give him good marks as first responder in the crisis. the question before the election is whether this huge story about disaster and executive response is the last big one before we vote. is it the october surprise? the black swan that swoops out of nowhere and changes everything? as scarlet o'hara said, there's always tomorrow. chuck todd is nbc's political director and john heilemann is "new york magazine's" national affairs editor and an msnbc analyst. i guess that's my question to start, but let me give you this first. the president this afternoon bagged a big endorsement, new york mayor mike bloomberg, who is always interesting to watch. he cited the president's stance on climate change as the major reason. he writes, quote, one believes a woman'
of power." it's no longer forthcoming, it is here. and in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. good morning, andrea. >> hi there. >> john heilemann, it's been such a long, long road since you guys started reporting on president barack obama -- then-senator barack obama's first election campaign in 2007. here we are five years later, a very emotional moment for the president who has endured five years of the highest highs and the lowest lows in politics. this has to be one of the most special moments for the man. >> undoubtedly. you know, it will be -- you think about the significance of him winning the first time, obviously, an historic moment. but in a lot of ways, you know, if he had lost on tuesday night, there would have been a lot of people who kind of consigned that victory to an accident. >> he would have been an aberration of history. >> almost re-election means as much and maybe in some ways more than the first time, you know. he's not a guy given to public emotion, displays of emotion. back in 2008
in washington that we've enjoyed so much over the past two years. >> that actually is the question before we get to our panel. we have a lot of the same still to come. what will be different and what is the lesson learned from this? >> well, it's status quo. you've got the president sitting in charge of the executive branch, obviously, president obama. the house remains in republicans' control. and the senate -- i think, you know, big pickup for the depths in the senate. all of these key races that were supposed to be so close got blown out. that's really where the soul searching's going to take place. because as i said i've said repeatedly for four years, when you run in the house, you can beat something with nothing. and i'm living proof of that. i did it in 1994. >> he undercuts himself. >> but when you run in the senate and the electorate expands, you've got to be a bit more toward the middle. and when you run for the white house, you'd better have a governing philosophy that will pull bucks county in pennsylvania, that will pull the i-4 corridor and that will pull these swing states. i'll t
. thank you, jamal for the introduction. again, i'm jonathan capehart, opinion brighter at the washington post an msnbc contributor. they've set the stage for why we are here this morning, so i'm not going to keep talking. i'm just going to get started. you have heard from marc morial. next is joel packer, noted authority in federal education policy. to his left is dr. michael fauntroy at george mason university where he teaches urban policy comes civil rights policy and american government and we have just heard from janet murguia from national council of the bras. with that, mr. packer, to make is yours. >> first, thank you for the introduction and mark and chanel for others for having me on the piano with my colleagues here. so a couple of good things about the raising group in case you don't know. the briefing groups and government affairs, public affairs firm with 42 folks on our staff. overall majority of clients or progressive nonprofit organizations. firms really committed to advancing the ideals and missions of the whole broad range of the progressive community. personally i do e
the way they are. we've seen over the last four years the status quo in washington they are powerful and they have fought us every step of the way. we've tried and succeeded in reforming our health care system. they spent millions trying to stop us. when we tried and succeeded in reforming wall street, they spent millions to push us back. we kept on going but those were tough fights. what they are counting on now is that you'll get worn down by all the squabble. you'll get fed up with the dysfunction. you'll give up on the change we fought for. you'll walk away and leave them to make decisions that affect every american. in other words, their bet is on cynicism but iowa you taught me to bet on you. you taught me to bet on hope. i'll work with anybody of any party to move this country forward. if you want to break the gridlock in congress you'll vote for leaders who feel the same way whether they're democrats or republicans or independents. the kind of iowa leaders you've always had. there's some principles you got to fight for. there are times where you got to take a stand. the price
ago, nobody foresaw. >> meanwhile back home in washington, congress is off for a week for the thanksgiving holiday, lawmakers are vowing to get to the bottom of intelligence questions in the immediate wake of the deadly attack of a u.s. consulate in libya, including whether ambassador susan rice's so-called talking points were altared the weekend after she gave that announcem of the attack. >> she didn't know anything about the attack in benghazi and the most politically compliant person. i don't know what she knew, but i know that the story she told was misleading. >> the debate on the hill intensified by general david petraeus' testimony friday that they suspected terrorism from the very beginning. >> why do you tell the american public something that is different in meaning? it should be perhaps leave out the details or the sources and then -- >> well, again, though, the details here were al qaeda. >> before you get to the question of what susan rice should or shouldn't have said, i think that we need to know the answer of who changed the talking points and why. >>
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
? in a very important election. and you're going to tell me we can't do better than this? washington ought to fix this no matter who wins. maybe they're hoping the democrats just will go home. they don't want to wait in line anymore. joining me tonight, mitch sezer. he's also on the executive board of the democratic committee as a representative of the 14 southern states. i mean, it's great to have you with us tonight. but it just infuriates me when i see video tape like that. i mean, we vote like a third world country. >> well, welcome to ground zero. homeland of rick scott. i will expand the bid and tell you that folks who got online before 7:00, those people had a process by either midnight or 1:00 a.m. this morning. these are people who want their dmok, want the right to vote, and what's standing in their way, as you said, is governor rick scott. >> why is he doing this? why isn't he saying we're going to exhaust every effort we can to make sure there's democracy. i know the answer to it. i want to hear yours. >> it's obvious democrats do well in early voting. statistics prove it. also
. i think you guys have a poll out. the nbc washington "wall street journal" poll shows him up by six. you saw romney scrambling to try to change the narrative around the auto bailout. you have the car companies with saying he hasn't been truthful. the fact is four years ago, the unemployment rate was 12%. it's around 7% now. so they are looking at an economy that has improved over the last four years. it's hard for romney's campaign to gain traction there in talking about the economy being so horrible because the reality there is that it has improved. >> john, every credible poll shows romney behind in ohio. do you see it plausible he takes that state? >> the plausible scenario for mitt romney in ohio and other battleground states that are very close like florida or virginia, colorado, that sort of thing, the intensity, the enthusiasm for romney, the zeal of his electle electoral rat, te is built around enthusiasm and what the likely voters screens produce. what we're seeing nationally in our poll today is a 48%/47% race. there's a bit of a mystery to that. it's part art and part sci
is cut by half this year. 25 million people have already voted early in 34 states and washington, d.c. >>> and back to the frenetic pace on the campaign trail. both candidates have already held rallies in new hampshire, iowa, and wisconsin. >> you do want to be able to trust your president. you want to know -- you want to know that -- that your president means what he says and says what he means. after four years of president, you know me. you may not agree with every decision i have made. you may at times have been frustrated by the pace of change, but you know what i believe. you know where i stand. >> made a lot of promises, but those promises he couldn't keep. and the difference between us, he made promises he couldn't keep. i'm making promises i have kept and i will keep them for the american people. i have a clear and unequivocal message, and that is america is about to come roaring back. [ cheering ] >> joining me now, "washington post" columnist and msnbc analyst eugene robinson, marc caputo and mark murray. thank you so much, gentlemen, for joining. i got to bring eugene in
of trying to get things accomplished in washington. >> bill mcinturf and peter hart. the best in the business, the best poll and we're so happy and proud to have you and have you as colleagues, thank you very much. >>> mitt romney is touching all bases today, from iowa to ohio, where the campaign is going head to head with the obama team's ground troops, county by county. shawn spicer, shawn, good to see you. i want to ask you about the travel plans. the fact that the romney/ryan team going to pennsylvania has raised a lot of eyebrows, the democrats say it's desperation, because they know they can't win ohio, have to find some other route to 270. republicans in pennsylvania and elsewhere say it's a real campaign. and that there's a real possibility there. tell us what you're seeing on the ground. >> i think we're going to carry ohio. i think we got real shot at pennsylvania. so if you use their metric, the governor and paul ryan have been in ohio extensively over the last couple of days, they'll continue to be there in the last 48 hours that proves that we believe we think we'
're going to tell me that we can't do better than this? washington better fix this no matter who wins. maybe they are hoping the democrats will go home and they don't want to wait in line anymore. joining me now is chairman of the broward county democratic party on the executive board of the national committee as a representative of the 14 southern states. i mean, it's great to have you with us but it just infuriates me when i see videotape like that. we vote like a third world country. >> well, welcome to ground zero, which is south florida, homeland of rick scott. lee expand a bit and tell you that yesterday in broward, dade, and palm beach, folks that got online right before 7:00, those people are following a process by either midnight or 1:00 a.m. this morning, these are people who want their democracy, want the right to vote and are standing in their way. >> why isn't he saying, we're going to exhaust every effort that we can to ensure that there's democracy? i know the answer to that. i want to hear yours. >> it's obvious that democrats do well in early voting, also minorities tend to
editor of the grio and ryan grim, washington bureau chief for "the huffington post." joy, i want to go to you first in terms of the akin and mourdock races, these guys can't help but stepping in it and now it seems like the chickens are coming home to roost. >> thanks to crazy, democrats are going to hold on to the seat. thank you, crazy. i think it's good that these guys ran in the sense that it has ripped the veil off of something that particularly younger women, a lot of democrats either didn't know or didn't want to think about, which is that you have a hard core religious element within the republican party that does believe that women should not be making basic choices about their health care and that women have ruined the workforce for being in it. >> and women being dragged around by their hair and so forth? >> indeed. i'm predicting that mccaskill will do better than that margin. a lot of people say they are going to vote for republican but i have a pretty good feeling she is going to do well. >> ryan, it's amazing how it's turned the departure of senior leadership, the republ
the republican mayor ordered them closed. joining me now from washington is karen finney a former dnc director, msnbc political analyst. and here with me is the great eugene robinson. welcome to both of you. gene, these long lines in florida are there because rick scott decided to cut the early voting days almost in half. 2.5 million people have voted early. yet we're expected to believe this has got nothing to do with politics. what is this man doing? >> well, there are two american traditions here at work. one is vote k problems in florida. this is something we like to do. and the second is republicans trying to restrict the franchise. if you can narrow the electorate and keep those democratic people, the system and throughout this election cycle we're seeing more of it. >> eugene, you use a voice that sounds accepting. this is appalling. >> i don't mean to. it is appalling. we've seen it before. >> people died in 1965 for the right to vote and now they're being prevented from doing so. >> exactly. exactly. >> karen, in ohio the big story is the states provisional ballot. the republican in c
of light rain in washington state. election day, we're looking good. now let's talk about the nor'easter and the effects for everyone devastated by sandy. first off, the coldest morning yet this fall season and the coldest morning since the hurricane, windchills are in the 20s right now. as far as the storm evolution, let's put it in motion and watch it coming up the north. watch the clock moving to the right. as it heads to the north, the rain shields off the coast. possibility of snow from philadelphia to trenton, up to the jersey shore, rain down around southern new england. what this all means is a little further off the coast, the winds would be a little bit weaker right along the shore. but we do have the possibility of seeing snow now in the areas hit by sandy. i think we'd take that, couple inches of wet, sloppy snow, no further irs for the power outages. again, good news as far as the nor'easter's concerned. you're watching "morning joe." more continuing coverage from democracy plaza, we're brewed by starbucks. no, no, no, stop! humans -- one day, we're coming up with the
been a storm in washington for the past four years. people couldn't see it, just by turning on the tv, but they hear about it. we have a continuing financial crisis in this country, and the republican obstructionists, well, they refuse to help. president obama came into office with a crisis on the scale of this current natural disaster. it required a heavy lift. from all players to get america back on track. republicans, where were they? well, they were not willing participants. journalist michael grunwald wrote, "vice president joe biden was warned not to expect any bipartisan cooperation on major votes. biden said, i spoke to seven different republican senators who said, joe, i'm not going to be able to help you on anything." his informants said senate minority leader mitch mcconnell had demanded unified resistance. the way it was characterized to me was for the next two years we can't let you succeed in anything. that's our ticket to coming back. what if we took that attitude right there to the storm damage and cleanup? now mitt romney said he's the guy who can reach across the ais
washington to dine at the white house was taken as an outrage in many corridors. america today is a world away from the cruel and prideful bigotry of that time. there is no better evidence of this than the election of an african-american to the presidency of the united states. >> senator mccain was right. that at no other time in american history could this moment have been possible. and even as the opponent, he was a bit swept up in that moment. remember the front page of the new york times after the election, obama, racial barrier falls in decisive victory. the victory was decisive, but the barrier had not fallen. then senator obama was simply hoisted over it, propelled by decades of civil rights demonstrations. hard won legislative victories, educational opportunities and shifting racial boundaries. but senator mccain, "the new york times" and frankly many pundits writing in the heady moments of the victory failed to articulate how firmly the barriers remained intabt. the win was a culmination, not the single definitive, most sought after culmination, but a culmination of racial strugg
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)